Couch Potato: My Dramatic Trip to “Riverdale”

Hello hello hello, my pets—Nikkie here. I feel like it’s been forever since I’ve gazed upon your shining, beautiful faces. Probably because I’ve never seen them, unless I know you in real life . . . But that’s neither here nor there! The point is that I’m back at it, blog styles, and we’re all super excited about it.

To shake off my cobwebs, I’m gonna keep it brief and just talk a little bit about my latest obsession: the CW’s Riverdale. I had been initially excited when I heard the show was being created. I read Archie comics a lot growing up, and I was definitely into the #HotArchie reboot. But when I found out Riverdale was going to be a dramatic murder mystery of a show, I was less thrilled. Why does everything have to be a gritty re-imagining, full of drama and violence and sex? But then they cast Cole Sprouse as Jughead, and because I’ve recently become obsessed with him, I knew I’d eventually get around to watching this show.

I ended up having to wait until it came to Netflix because when I finally ventured over to the CW website after the show’d been running for a few weeks, the few first episodes weren’t up anymore! Ugh! Thankfully, the wait for Netflix wasn’t that long, and I avoided spoilers pretty easily. I was never looking forward to watching the show, per se. It just seemed like something I’d have to grit my teeth and bear.

Then I watched it. And somehow, by show’s end, I was certifiably obsessed. (Light spoilers ahead.) Continue reading “Couch Potato: My Dramatic Trip to “Riverdale””

GUEST POST: Let’s Talk About the Depiction of Mental Illness in Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why”

Hey everyone—Nikkie here! I’m just popping in to tell you to put your hands together for my lovely and talented bestie, Christina, who is gracing us with a guest post on the recent Netflix adaptation of the popular YA book 13 Reasons Why. Enjoy!


I was five when I had my first panic attack. My dad took me to my usual Wednesday night ballet class after picking me up from the sitter’s house. After I suited up in my tutu and pink ballet flats, we started rehearsal.  I was excited because that day was particularly special: We were going to show off the turns we worked on the week prior. As we got into position, I looked at the row of seats to my right to make sure Dad was paying attention and realized he wasn’t there.

Panic immediately took over. I was by myself. Everyone else had someone to share that moment with, but not me. I’m not sure what happened next, but tears filled my eyes, I couldn’t breathe, and I sat on the floor with my knees tucked near my chest as I rocked myself. Twenty minutes later, after ringing my dad several times, he returned to pick me up from practice, apologizing for leaving by explaining he went to the store.

Of course, at the time, I didn’t know what I was experiencing, or why my brain switched into flight mode, but I recall that being my first dance with anxiety.


I’m close to 30 now, and I’ve been diagnosed with moderate to severe anxiety, abandonment issues, moderate depression and PTSD from traumatic episodes that happened throughout my upbringing. I’m a walking, breathing, living example of what it means to have mental illnesses. I’ve struggled with bouts of laying in my bed for days; waking up in the middle of the night from anxiety attacks taking over; ugly crying fits where it seems like I’ll never catch my breath. I used to be ashamed of my mental disorders until I found ways to relate to the outside world.

The media was my solace for accepting who I was and what I went through. In my teens, I saw characters who had the same struggles I did grace the screen and swim through book pages. And for the first time in my life, I didn’t feel alone. I’m sure that’s how a lot of others within the mental disorder community felt when 13 Reasons Why made its novel debut in 2007. The world was introduced to Hannah Baker, a teenager trying to survive the trials and tribulations of high school, but ultimately feeling helpless and like she had to take matters into her own hands. Nearly 10 years later, her story became a Netflix original series, and it has stirred the controversy pot of the internet, psychologists, and parents alike. But is the adaptation as severe as the critics paint Hannah’s story to be? Continue reading “GUEST POST: Let’s Talk About the Depiction of Mental Illness in Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why””

Character Crush: Ladies on the Small Screen

Hello, hello, friends. Happy Women’s History Month from your favorite MWB woman. And I don’t even mind that I’m the only one here, thus leaving you with very few options for favorites.
I’ve finally managed to drag myself out of a work-exhausted stupor, which was coupled with an “adjusting to new medication” fog, to make a glorious return to the blogsophere. Well, I won’t say glorious; this is going to be extremely off the cuff. The point is that I’m here!

Because it’s Women’s History Month, I thought it apropos that all my posts this month be about fictional women in TV, books, and movies that I’ve enjoyed. Then I thought, Oh! I should do these on Wednesdays because of #WomanCrushWednesday. Then I realized it was a Thursday when I thought of it, and already the second Thursday of March, so I was already behind. So I decided I’d wait till today and talk about enough ladies to make up for the deficit. Which means I’m starting with my favorite characters from television.

Let’s jump in!

Continue reading “Character Crush: Ladies on the Small Screen”

TV Trauma: The After Effects of “Gilmore Girls”

‘Ello ‘ello. It’s your favorite married blogger, Nikkie, saying thanks for taking a break from your murderous, psychopathic shopping sprees to feast your eyes on our humble little slice of the Internet. How will I reward you? By complaining about “Gilmore Girls” some more. You’re welcome!

I know what you’re thinking. “Nikkie, you were supposed to do another blog post before you go to the continuation of your ‘Gilmore Girls’ rage.” And you’re right about that. But then the election happened—enough said. So I’m sorry that this post, in conjunction with my last post, makes me seem all grouchy. On the other hand, I’m not that sorry! Sometimes things suck, and that needs to be conveyed.

Additionally, while I will be using “Gilmore Girls” as an example throughout this post, what I’m really trying to do is point out some issues I have with the way a lot of shows are being written. So, I arguably apologize for crapping all over this show yet again . . . but at this point, you should know what to expect from me. Continue reading “TV Trauma: The After Effects of “Gilmore Girls””

When the Lewis Lady Met the Gilmore Girls

Hellooooooooo, ladies and gents (and all you lovely folk who don’t subscribe to a binary gender). It’s ya girl Nikkie, and I’m back at it again with that blog life. In case post titles mean nothing to you, today I’ll be talking about my experience watching the early aughts’ TV “hit,” Gilmore Girls, for the first time.

The decision to watch this show was a purposeful accident. Basically, I was looking for a new show to watch because I was in a reading slump. I brought this up to my bestie, who suggested Gilmore Girls because she considered it “mindless” TV that I could just throw on while going about my life. I was on the fence because the very minimal deets I knew about the show did not interest me in any way—and I have an irrational hatred of Jared Padelecki, a main player in the first five or six seasons—so I wasn’t prepared to take her advice. But then I took several “What should I watch next on Netflix” quizzes, and the majority offered up the same selection. It was clear the universe wanted me to get acquainted with Lorelai and Rory Gilmore and their quirky ilk over in Stars Hollow. Having completed the series, I have one question for the universe:

DEAR GOD, WHY?!

From the very beginning, I was not a fan. Have you ever rage-watched an entire show? That was my experience here. I just couldn’t believe that this show had been so popular and apparently worthy of seven full seasons, so I kept watching because I naively believed that it HAD to get better. No, no. It got worse.

It was obvious that I had to write a blog post about this experience. But I have so many thoughts not just about the show but about the art of TV in general that there’s no way I can fit it all into one post. So for today, I will be focusing on my likes (yes, there were a few) and dislikes about the show.

To the friends of mine who are currently watching the show for the first time: Don’t go beyond this point! SPOILERS ABOUND, so if you care about that kind of thing, geeeeet ooouuuutttaaa heeeeeere.
To fans of the show: If you choose to read any further, you are opening yourself up to potential hurt feelings. I will not go easy on this show, and I will not apologize for that. If this is your absolute favorite show in the whole entire world . . . I will wonder if you’ve been trapped in a bunker with only this as your option for entertainment, but my intent in writing this is not to try and change your mind or make you feel bad. These are just my thoughts. So if you dive into these murky, hate-filled waters, that’s on you.
Everyone else: . . . Are y’all ready for this?

Continue reading “When the Lewis Lady Met the Gilmore Girls”

Seven Kingdoms, One Review: Our Weekend After “Game of Thrones” Season 6

Welcome, friends, to our first Sunday without Game of Thrones, and can we first just say: WOW.

If the title of this post has done its job, then those reading are here for our collected thoughts on season 6 of HBO’s Game of Thrones, which ended with the LITERALLY EXPLOSIVE and amazing finale “The Winds of Winter” this past Sunday. If you haven’t finished watching yet, do not tread beyond this paragraph; thar be spoilers ahead. If you’re all caught up, then you know what that opening WOW was all about.

Now, we’re not here to talk about the finale. Events from it will come up a lot, of course, because it and its predecessor “Battle of the Bastards” were some of the greatest episodes to date. But we also want to touch on the season as a whole as well as hypothesize about what we’ll see in the 14 episodes that remain to us. (No, YOU’RE crying.) Basically, we have a lot of thoughts, and we want to lay them all on you!

Do you think you can handle it? For this post is long (very long) and full of ramblings.

Continue reading “Seven Kingdoms, One Review: Our Weekend After “Game of Thrones” Season 6″

My Yara Greyjoy Dilemma

Hello, hello, hello.

If you watch Game of Thrones, then you know that we’re nearing the end of the sixth season. This one seems to be fairly divisive. There are those who have found some of the episodes to be very slow because they involved a lot of setup and little action, and don’t even get people started on the whole Dorne debacle (although at least it seems like we aren’t going to return to that shit show, so yay). Personally, I’ve enjoyed the season a lot—I rejoiced at Jon’s return and was devastated by the Hodor/”Hold the Door” reveal—but ever since the trailers for this season were released, I have been dreading one scene in particular. This past Sunday ended up being the fateful day with its episode “The Broken Man,” and let’s just say . . . I was thoroughly disappointed.

What is the occurrence that dared to stick in my craw, you’re wondering?

It was the reveal that Yara Greyjoy, older sister of Theon Grejoy and almost-queen of the Iron Islands, is a lesbian.

Before you freak out on me, no; I do not have a problem with anyone on the GLBTQA+ spectrum. I believe that sexuality is open and fluid, and we should all be able to love who we want to love without worry or fear or judgement. So this is not some bigoted argument about how I “don’t want to see that kind of thing.” Bring on your queer characters, GoT and other shows. My issue is that if you’re going to do it, do it right, and Yara’s characterization was not done right in my opinion.

So let’s talk about why it’s getting me down. Continue reading “My Yara Greyjoy Dilemma”